Meet the Textile Artist With an Unbeatable Turquoise Collection

Meet the Textile Artist With an Unbeatable Turquoise Collection

“This belt was my first actual concho belt. My late grandma Nellie had mentioned how someone was selling it at the gas station. A lot of people sell jewelry at the gas station. When my grandma gifted it to me, she said, ‘I know it’s just nickel, but this can hold you over until you can get a real silver belt. I don’t get why they used real turquoise though.’ That belt carried me through many modeling gigs, weaving demonstrations, and photo shoots.”Photo: Tyler Glasses

Outfit-wise, Glasses lets her turquoise pieces shine on their own. “I could wear a plain T-shirt and a plain skirt, then I toss on jewelry, and it brings the outfit up a notch,” says Glasses. “When I wear my jewelry, people will ask me where I’m headed while being ‘all dressed up.’” 

Some of her favorite places to look for new pieces are in the nearby town of Gallup, New Mexico. “A lot of people may not know that a lot of artists live in or near Gallup,” says Glasses. “I’ll go to raw materials stores that carry turquoise, coral, and silver, and I’ll be lucky enough to meet artists there and place future orders with them.” She’s also found amazing turquoise pieces at the Santa Fe Indian Market and Heard Market. “My new favorite spot is the R.C. Gorman Navajo Gallery, which features Philander Begay jewelry,” says Glasses.

“My late grandma Nellie made a deal with a gallery to do a partial trade for this ring and part money. This ring was one that she definitely knew didn’t fit her; however, she knew it fit me, so once she got it, she told me, ‘Oh, it doesn’t fit me. Just hold on to it and wear it for me.’ It is still a solid staple in my jewelry collection, and I still wear it for her.”Photo: Tyler Glasses
Photo: Tyler Glasses
Photo: Tyler Glasses

Glasses is always on the hunt for the next big turquoise find—and if anyone can find a rare piece, it’s her. But for now, the window-shopping must come to a brief pause; she has more weaving to do. “I’m focusing on what I will be weaving for the next show, the Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair & Market, which is in early March,” says Glasses. “There are also custom weaving orders that I’m getting done. Seeing my brother Tyler’s poncho that he wove for Santa Fe Indian Market, I’d also really like to tackle more wearable pieces in my weaving journey.”

Photo: Tyler Glasses
Photo: Tyler Glasses

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